Cannabidiol In Patients With Treatment-resistant Epilepsy: An Open-label Interventional Trial

Epilepsy Dravet syndrome Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS)

Key Findings

Almost a third of patients with epilepsy have a treatment-resistant form, which is associated with severe morbidity and increased mortality. Adverse events reported in more than 10% of patients were somnolence (n=41 [25%]), decreased appetite (n=31 [19%]), diarrhoea (n=31 [19%]), fatigue (n=21 [13%]), and convulsion (n=18 [11%]). Five (3%) patients discontinued treatment because of an adverse event. Our findings suggest that cannabidiol might reduce seizure frequency and might have an adequate safety profile in children and young adults with highly treatment-resistant epilepsy. The median reduction in monthly motor seizures was 36.5%.

Information and Links


Link: Cannabidiol In Patients With Treatment-resistant Epilepsy: An Open-label Interventional Trial

Year: 2016

DOI: 10.1016/S1474-4422(15)00379-8


Ratings

(How Ratings Work)

Epilepsy — 4


Probability toward demonstrable efficacy of cannabis for treatment of Epilepsy according to the results found in this study.

Dravet syndrome — 4


Probability toward demonstrable efficacy of cannabis for treatment of Dravet syndrome according to the results found in this study.

Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) — 4


Probability toward demonstrable efficacy of cannabis for treatment of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) according to the results found in this study.

Drugs Used

Oral cannabidiol (2-5 mg/kg per day, up-titrated until intolerance or to a maximum dose of 25 mg/kg or 50 mg/kg per day)