Inhibitory CB1 and activating/desensitizing TRPV1-mediated cannabinoid actions on CGRP release in rodent skin.

Pain (Acute) Pain (Chronic Non-Malignant) Pain (Due to Advanced Cancer)

Key Findings

Cannabinoid-induced antinociception relies on activation of inhibitory cannabinoid receptors (CB1) in the peripheral and central nervous system. However, most cannabinoids at higher concentration also activate excitatory ionotropic transient receptor potential (TRP) channels coexpressed with CB1 in primary nociceptive neurons that contain and release calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) upon activation. In conclusion, the antinociceptive potency of peripherally acting CB1 agonists is not restrained by opposing irritant effects through TRPV1 but by their own limited efficacy and narrow concentration-response relationship.

Information and Links


Link: Inhibitory CB1 and activating/desensitizing TRPV1-mediated cannabinoid actions on CGRP release in rodent skin.

Year: 2011

DOI: 10.1016/j.npep.2011.03.005


Ratings

(How Ratings Work)

Pain (Acute) — 1


Possibility of efficacy for cannabis in treatment of Pain (Acute) according to the results found in this study.

Pain (Chronic Non-Malignant) — 1


Possibility of efficacy for cannabis in treatment of Pain (Chronic Non-Malignant) according to the results found in this study.

Pain (Due to Advanced Cancer) — 1


Possibility of efficacy for cannabis in treatment of Pain (Due to Advanced Cancer) according to the results found in this study.

Drugs Used

Anandamide (AEA)

Delta-9-THC